Thursday, December 27, 2007

New Issue/Submissions :: Six Little Things

A new issue of Six Little Things is now online: issue #9, winter 2008, themed "A Penny Saved." It features new short work by Stefanie Freele, Richard Grayson, Ashley Hudson, Jayne Pupek, Kamau Rucker, and Patrick Swaney, as well as photographs by Melanie Faith. Submissions are currently open for issue #10, Spring 2008, themed "Cut Paper / Paper Cuts."

Anthology :: Queer Advice 3.15.08

Second Person Queer
How We Lived Our Lives and How You Can Live Yours
Edited by Richard Labont and Lawrence Schimel
Publisher: Arsenal Pulp Press
Deadline: March 15, 2008

Seeking short, informed essays preferably between 1,000-2,000 words written in the second person (addressed to a "you") for an anthology of life advice from the GLBT community to the GLBT community.

Contributors are invited to approach the book in two ways:

1) "How-to" essays, which should be instructive in nature and have a title that begins "How To." No topic is out of bounds as long as it imparts a useful queer lesson to others. The essays can be profound or practical or humorous or heart-rending - or a blend of styles - but must be written in the second person (addressed to a "you").

2) Open Letters. Write a letter to someone specific - whether a public persona (celebrity, politician, author, etc.) or someone drawn from your personal
life (a teacher, a relative, a neighbour, whoever) - in which you either offer
advice or thank them for things you learned from them (their example). Willing to consider will be open letters to a child (relative, child of queer parents, etc.) whose sexuality is not yet defined, and to whom one is offering advice on how to deal with the pressures of heteronormative society while growing up. Note, however, that only one or two such pieces will be included in the book, so your chances of publication increase tremendously if you choose a more original subject.

Submission instructions:

1) Title the file with author's last name and story title in the file name: Surname-Title.doc (Do not simply title your piece SecondPersonQueer.com, at least not the version you submit to us.)
2) Include your name, your mailing address, your email address, and a bio WITHIN the .doc file with your piece, as submissions will be separated from emails to be read.
3) Submit your work by email, as an attachment in .doc format, to: secondpersonqueer-at-gmail.com

Payment: A small honorarium and one copy of the book will be paid. (Please note that payment is in Canadian funds.)

As an anthology for a Canadian publisher, preference will be given to
submissions from Canadian writers. But the anthology is open to submissions from all writers, and is actively interested in non-North American writers.

Wednesday, December 26, 2007

Punc't Art

( ) Significant Aside
by Seymour Chwast

Sometimes old is new again, especially when discovered on the web. This is from a 2005 exhibit, but the images - still available on The Kean Review's web site - are timelessly fun. From HOW Design:

GRAMMAR RULES. PERIOD.

For David Schimmel, president and creative director of And Partners, one of the best parts of Punc't was getting to play client. It was like Christmas morning as each poster hit his desk and he uncovered another top designer's interpretation of a punctuation mark. "It was a delight to get them," he says. "I had a different response to each one." When all 24 creations were in hand, Schimmel put together an invitation for the Punc't reception and charity auction, as well as a catalog to showcase the posters.

These promotional pieces have a high-end, art gallery feel that's clean and sophisticated. And since Schimmel didn't want to favor one style over another, the invitation doesn't include any poster images at all. The catalog, on the other hand, makes the posters the hero, giving each work its own page to shine. "On the whole, paper promos aren't the memorable, savable, industry-influencing works that they were a decade or two ago," says judge Bryn Mooth. "This one is."

When it came time to arrange the posters within the catalog, Schimmel tried alphabetizing the pieces by each designer's last name and was pleasantly surprised at how well everything fell into place. As luck would have it, he'd assigned James Victore the period, giving his poster of a cowboy riding off into the sunset the perfect spot to declare, "The end."

POSTER DESIGNERS Seymour Chwast, Alexander Isley, Michael Bierut, Alexander Gelman, Stefan Sagmeister, Sam Potts, Aimee Sealfon-Eng, Woody Pirtle, Paula Scher, James Victore, Michael Ian Kaye, Carin Goldberg, David Schimmel, Scott Stowell, Steff Geissbuhler, Mirko Ilic, Chip Kidd, Steven Brower, Kent Hunter, Emily Oberman, Bonnie Siegler, Todd St. John, Robert Valentine, Marcos Chin, Roberto de Vicq de Cumptich

See the full display of posters here on The Kean Review.

Jobs :: Various

St. Lawrence University - Fiction or creative non-fiction writers with significant publications and teaching experience are invited to apply for the position of Viebranz Visiting Professor of Creative Writing for the academic year 2008-09. Peter Bailey, Chair, Viebranz Search Committee, Department of English. January 15, 2008.

Point Park University - Full-time, tenure track undergraduate faculty position in English/Creative Writing at the assistant or associate professor level.

Southern New Hampshire University invites applications for the full-time position of Assistant Professor in Creative Writing/Composition. January 20, 2008.

New Issue Online :: Prick of the Spindle

Prick of the Spindle has just launched its third issue, featuring:

Interview with Ann Hood, author of The Knitting Circle
Film Review - The Outsiders of New Orleans: Loujon Press from Wayne Ewing Films
Article - Boston poetry reading, "A Tribute to Melissa Green"
Journal Review - Sein und Werden
Poetry Review - My Body: New and Selected Poems by Joan Larkin

Poetry by Mary Bargteil, Evelyn Lauer, Amber Norwood, and more
Fiction by Mary Bargteil, Jimmy Chen, and Caitlin Horvat

An excerpt from the concise novel, There's a House in Graham's Head or A Long Story Short by Graham Trim
And nonfiction by Jason Mott and J.D. Riso

Prick of the Spindle also congratulates their Pushcart Nominees (works available on site archive):
"The Vanity" by Joseph Murphy
"Simple Tips for the Beginning Cook" by Jacqueline May
"Wallace" by Casady Monroe
"Study in Burgundy" by Eric Mohrman
"Some Explanations for Fainting Goats" by Juliet Cook
"Untitled (to jenny)" by Wei Liu

Submission Information: Article writers seeking to publish may send Prick of the Spindle articles on writing-related topics. Publishers or filmmakers interested in submitting work for review may contact the editor. Prick of the Spindle is open to submissions year-round.

Friday, December 21, 2007

In Memoriam :: Sandy Taylor

NewPages was saddened to hear the news that Alexander "Sandy" Taylor of Curbstone Press passed away Thursday evening, December 20, 2007, after suffering a major stroke. Sandy was a dear friend and long-time supporter and advisor to NewPages. We will miss him dearly. Our heartfelt support and strength to his family, friends, and literary colleagues.

The Summer of 2006, Jessica Powers interviewed Sandy for NewPages. Read the interview here.

From Cune Magazine:
Curbstone Press is a place where the writers of many cultures meet, united by a common concern to produce literature that deals with social realities and that promotes a respect for human rights, civil liberties, human dignity, and multicultural understanding. Curbstone seeks out the highest aesthetic expression of the dedication to human rights: poetry, stories, novels, testimonials, photography. Editorial integrity is combined with painstaking craft in the creation of books, books of passion and purpose.

Co-directors Alexander Taylor and Judy Doyle began the press when James Scully returned from Chile with a poetry manuscript. Taylor says, "We were fairly certain that a commercial house would not do the book, both because of its attack on the Pinochet regime and because it was not of standard length. We published it because we felt the poetry was stunning and because we felt it was necessary for the public to know what was really going on in Chile." Both Alexander and Judy have their roots in the Civil Rights Movement, the Anti-War Movement, and the Solidarity with Central America Movement, and a long interest in publishing. These two drives came together when they formed their publishing company.

Curbstone has become know as a preeminent source of translations of work by Latin American and Central American authors; however, one of their recent releases is a novel by Marnie Mueller about the injustice inflicted on Japanese Americans by their forced relocation during World War II, and it is a perfect example of their mission. Publishers Weekly called it "An engrossing character study." Alexander Taylor says, "It’s a story where no one person is either right or wrong, and it forces us to examine our own consciences."

2nd River Creates the Flow

2River has just released the 12.2 (Winter 2008)issue of The 2River View, with new poems by Wendy Taylor Carlisle, Mark Cunningham, Lightsey Darst, DejaEarley, Taylor Graham, Mercedes Lawry, Patrick Leonard, Jo McDougall, BrentPallas, Emily Scudder, and Phibby Venable; and new art by Mitko Zhelezarov.

Available now online and in PDF format is Number 18 in the 2River Chapbook Series. In his collection of prose poems, Attractions, John Allman uses memory and speculation to bring together subjects as diverse as Einstein, Yugoslavia, chickens, drums, evergreens, and Christopher Columbus.

2nd River also hosts Muddy Bank: podcasts and commentaries and a "Favorite Poem Project" site which combine poetry and video: "Many of the videos here originated as assignments by creative writing students at St. Louis community College—Meramec. The Favorite Poem assignment is based on another in which the students compile an anthology of contemporary poetry. In the Favorite Poem Project, students present a poem from their anthology as their favorite poem. Anyone, however, is encouraged to follow the lead of these students and submit videos to the 2River Favorite Poem Project."

Great stuff for teachers and students as well as us general readers.

Images of War :: Greenfield-Sanders

Bringing Home Iraq
By Nicolaus Mills
From Dissent Magazine

"When we think of photographs from the Second World War, we think of Robert Capa’s D-Day pictures of American infantrymen struggling to get ashore at Normandy. When we think of Vietnam War photographs, we think of Larry Burrows’s pictures of U. S. Marines bogged down in the mud and dense growth of the Vietnam highlands. Now comes Iraq, and this time the photographs that best capture the war are the pictures of Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, currently at the Steven Kasher Gallery in New York in a show that opened on November 15 and that will run through December 22.

"Greenfield-Sanders’s Iraq photographs are already well known. They were made to accompany the HBO documentary, Alive Day Memories: Home from Iraq, which James Gandolfini, the star of the Sopranos, produced. The documentary revolved around interviews that Gandolfini conducted with ten wounded soldiers, who talked about the Iraq war and their memories of “alive day,” the day they narrowly escaped being killed... [read the rest and see more images here]

Thursday, December 20, 2007

Glimmer Train Announces Contest Winners

Glimmer Train has selected the three winning stories of their Fall Short Story Award for New Writers! This award is given twice a year to writers whose fiction has not yet appeared in a publication with a circulation greater than 5000.

First place: E. A. Durden of Brooklyn, New York, wins $1200 for “Mr. Dabydeen”. Her story will be published next year.

Second place: Hubert Ahn of West Bloomfield, Michigan, wins $500 for “Korean Wedding”. His story will also be published in an upcoming issue, increasing his prize to $700.

Third place: Patrick Hicks of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, wins $300 for “57 Gatwick”. His story will also be published in an upcoming issue, increasing his prize to $700, as well.

UPDATE: Glimmer Train has offered a 2-day extension to their December Fiction Open. The deadline will be January 2, 2008.

Submissions :: Sphere

Sphere: An International Journal of Student Writing
Sponsored by The Literary Review and edited by Students in the BA Creative Writing Program at Fairleigh Dickinson University. The first online issue scheduled for spring 2008 and will feature fiction, poetry, and essays

Lit Mag Mailbag :: December 18

For information about these and many other quality literary magazines, click the links or visit The NewPages Guide to Literary Journals. Also visit the NewPages Literary Magazine Reviews for new reviews as well as an archive of past reviews.

6x6
Issue 14
Fall 2007
Triannualish

Alimentum
Issue 5
Winter 2008
Biannual
The Literature of Food

The Antigonish Review
Number 151
Autumn 2007
Quarterly

College Literature
General Issue
Volume 35 Issue 1
Winter 2008
Quarterly

Crazyhorse
Number 72
Fall 2007
Biannual

Creative Nonfiction
Essays from patients, their family members, and caregivers
Number 33
2007
Quarterly

Drash
Volume 1
Spring/Summer 2007
Annual

Eclipse
Volume 18
Fall 2007
Annual

Ecotone
Volume 3 Number 1
Fall 2007
Biannual

The Georgia Review
“Special Feature: Harry Crews Autobiography and Letters"
Volume 61 Number 4
Winter 2007
Quarterly

GreenPrints
"The Weeder's Digest"
Number 72
Winter 2007-08
Quarterly

Iconoclast
Issue 97
2007
Biannual

Isotope
Issue 5 Number 2
Fall/Winter 2007
Biannual

The Literary Review
Featuring: PEN Translation Fund Grant Recipients
Volume 51 Number 1
Fall 2007
Quarterly

One Story
“Fire Season” by Amelia Kahaney
Issue Number 98
2007
Monthly

Open Minds Quarterly
"Your psychosocial literary journal"
Volume 9 Issue 3
Fall 2007
Quarterly

Paterson Literary Review
Issue 36
2008-2009
Annual

Poetry
Volume 191 Number 3
December 2007
Monthly

Poetry East
Number 60
Fall 2007
Biannual

Prairie Schooner
Volume 81 Number 4
Winter 2007
Quarterly

Redivider
Volume 5 Issue 1
Fall 2007
Biannual

Ruminate
"faith in literature and art"
Issue 6
Winter 2007
Quarterly

Southern Humanities Review
Volume 41 Number 4
Fall 2007
Quarterly

Western Humanities Review
"What is City?"
Volume 61 Number 3
Fall 2007
Biannual

Zyzzyva
Volume 23 Number 3
Winter 2007
Triannual

Wednesday, December 19, 2007

NewPages Updates :: Lit Mag Reviews

A new batch of lit mag reviews has been posted at NewPages.com.

NewPages.com continues to seek out skilled writers interested in sharing their reviews with others. Our staff of dedicated reviewers does great work in setting the standard for lit mag reviews. If you are interested in joining NewPages.com and seeing your work on our site, check out our writer guidelines and get in touch with us.

Tuesday, December 18, 2007

Interview :: Ana Castillo

Writing in Netantla
LaVon Rice interviews author Ana Castillo

Excerpted from ColorLines
Nov/Dec 2007

"Yet another voice is weighing in on the fate of la frontera these days—but it’s a poet, not a pundit. In her latest novel, The Guardians, the multi-genre writer Ana Castillo takes a look at life on the U.S.-Mexico border with sensitivity and imagination—qualities often sorely lacking in the immigration debate today. Told through the eyes of several characters, The Guardians explores the politics of the border with irony, lyricism and desert-spare clarity... [read the rest here]"

First Print Issue :: Tarpaulin Sky

Founded in 2002 as an online literary journal, Tarpaulin Sky took the form of 12.5 internet issues before its first paper edition in November 2007. Moving into 2008 and beyond, the magazine will continue to publish new work both online and in print, often curated by guest-editors. Tarpaulin Sky focuses on cross-genre / trans-genre / hybrid forms as well as innovative poetry and prose. The journal emphasizes experiments with language and form, but holds no allegiance to any one style or school or network of writers - trying to avoid some of the defects associated with dipping too often into the same literary gene pool, and the diversity of their contributors is evidence of the TS's eclectic interests.

Sunday, December 16, 2007

State of Environment :: Journalists Shaken

Glacial Acceleration: A Sea of Troubles
Why what’s happening in Greenland matters now
By Paul Brown
From E-Magzine
December 14, 2007

"It is hard to shock journalists and at the same time leave them in awe of the power of nature. A group returning from a helicopter trip flying over, then landing on, the Greenland ice cap at the time of maximum ice melt last month were shaken. One shrugged and said, 'It is too late already.'

"What they were all talking about was the moulins, not one moulin but hundreds, possibly thousands. “Moulin” is a word I had only just become familiar with. It is the name for a giant hole in a glacier through which millions of gallons of melt water cascade through to the rock below. The water has the effect of lubricating the glaciers so they move at three times the rate that they did previously..." [read the rest and see more images here]

State of Environment :: Eco Tipping Points

Eco Tipping Points
How a vicious cycle can become virtuous
by Amanda Suutari and Gerald Marten
From Earth Island Journal
Summer 2007

"The cicadas are in full voice on a sultry morning in May as we make our way along a rickety wooden boardwalk that snakes through a community mangrove forest near Thung Dase village in southern Thailand. The mangroves offer welcome shade near a dock where a small boat is moored. Handmade bamboo traps are set to catch mud crabs when the tides go out. In a flash of orange and turquoise, a kingfisher swoops to a low-hanging branch.

"It’s hard to imagine that three decades ago the area’s lush abundance was collapsing into a wasteland. 'At one time,' recalls Nom Ham Yak, chair of the forest’s management committee, 'our economic base was crabs, fisheries, and rubber. Then areas were leased as concessions to private contractors to clear for charcoal, and the forest became badly degraded.'

"The prospects for the area’s villages were so bleak that a revival would have seemed a fantasy. What brought them back from the brink was an Eco Tipping Point.

"Eco Tipping Points offer a new paradigm for restoring our communities, both natural and human. Conventional approaches to ecological problems – from piecemeal micromanagement, to techno-fixes, to top-down regulation – often fail or generate new messes. But Eco Tipping Points show how the same forces that endanger environments and communities can be harnessed to heal them.

"To demonstrate what Eco Tipping Points are and how they work, consider two very different stories from two continents: the mangrove forests of Trang Province and the marshes of Arcata, California..." [read the rest and see more images here]

Friday, December 14, 2007

Oregon State University :: Residency

Oregon State University Andrews Forest Writers' Residencies

Creative writers whose work in any genre reflects a keen awareness of the natural world and an appreciation for both scientific and literary ways of knowing are invited to apply for one-week residencies at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest.

The mission of the Long-Term Ecological Reflections program is to bring together writers, humanists and scientists to create a living, growing record of how we understand the forest and the relation of people to the forest, as that understanding and that forest both change over time.

Next application deadline: December 31, 2007

n+1 on College :: What You Should Have Known

An excerpt from "All the Broke Young Literary Magazines: Flooded Highways, Disinterest in California, and Other Minor Setbacks on the n+1 West Coast Tour" by Christopher Frizzelle:

"[. . .]What We Should Have Known: Two Discussions, the 126-page pamphlet n+1 just published that's a conversation among writers about college—specifically, what they were made to read in college that they regret reading, or conversely what books they regret not having read sooner. I read What We Should Have Known in one sitting and loved it. It's funny. It's got references you might not know (the Norwegian philosopher Arne Naess) but it's unpretentious. Caleb Crain compares reading Henry James to smoking crack. Mark Greif talks about his sadness for college teachers, because some of their students 'have much more power in their brains and they have youth on their side, and they pick up teachers and fall in love with them and abandon them, throw them away like bits of trash or crumpled-up paper. But this is what you have to do as a student.'"

For $9, you can have your own copy of this recommended publication. Visit n+1 online order page. NewPages ponied up for a copy - you can, too!

First Line Treasure Hunt - Free Subscriptions

While you're out holiday shopping...The First Line is running a treasure hunt to celebrate ten years publication. They've hidden 100 vouchers for free subscriptions in bookstores across the country. More information, including hints and a map tracking which states have discovered their treasure, can be found here.

Wednesday, December 12, 2007

WGBH Say Brother Archives Online

A total of 215 Say Brother episodes from 1968 to 1982 have been organized and preserved by the WGBH Media Archives and Preservation Center through a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. One of television’s longest running program series by, for and about the African American community, Say Brother (now known as Basic Black) was born at a milestone moment in America’s history. The people and issues the show turned its lens on through the years tell, in capsule form, the history of both Black America and the city of Boston from the Civil Rights movement through the era of Black Power and the significant increase of numbers in the Black middle class.

Thanks to African American Review for this information.

Lit Mag Mailbag :: December 12

For information about these and many other quality literary magazines, click the links or visit The NewPages Guide to Literary Journals. Also visit the NewPages Literary Magazine Reviews for new reviews as well as an archive of past reviews.

American Short Fiction
Volume 10 Issue 39
Winter 2007
Quarterly

Beloit Poetry Journal
Volume 58 Number 2
Winter 2007
Quarterly

Brick
Issue 80
Winter 2007
Biannual

Freefall
Canada's magazine of Exquisite Writing
Volume 17 Number 2
Winter/Spring 2007-08
Biannual

Gulf Coast
Volume 20 Number 1
Winter 2007
Spring 2008
Biannual

Louisville Review
Number 62
Fall 2007
Biannual

Mississippi Review
New Fiction Issue
Volume 35 Number 3
Fall 2007
Biannual

New Letters
Volume 74 Number 1
2007-2008
Quarterly

Rattle
Conversation with Tess Gallagher, Arthur Sze; Tribute to Nurses; Rattle Poetry Prize Winner
Volume 13 Number 2
Winter 2007
Biannual

relief
A Quarterly Christian Expression
Volume 1 Issue 4
Summer 2007
Quarterly

River Styx
75
2007
Triannual

The Sewanee Review
"Ancestral Voices of War"
Volume 115 Number 4
Fall 2007
Quarterly

subTerrain
The Best in Outlaw Literature: "The Best of Campus Writing from Coast to Coast"
Volume 5 Number 47
2007
Biannual

Jobs :: Various

Franklin & Marshall College English Department invites applications from fiction writers for a possible one-year visiting Assistant Professorship, and also invites applications from creative non-fiction writers for a possible three-year visiting Assistant to begin in the fall of 2008. Judith Mueller, Chair, English Department. January 2, 2008.

Whitman College visiting Assistant Professor, one-year position, beginning August 2008. MFA or Ph.D. with fiction writing emphasis and evidence of publication required. Roberta Davidson, Chair, Department of English. February 22, 2008.

The English Department at Seton Hall University invites applications for a tenure-track position in Creative Writing specializing in fiction to begin September 2008. Ms. Y. Loftin, Human Resources. December 14, 2007.

Youngstown State University Instructor/Assistant Professor - English/Creative Writing & Fiction. Dr. Gary Salvner, Chairperson.

Tuesday, December 11, 2007

Submissions :: CV2 1.08-6.08

Contemporary Verse 2 is looking for submissions for poetry, critical writing about poetry and reviews of books of poetry for these upcoming issues:

Spring 2008: The Jilted Issue, deadline: January 31, 2008
Summer 2008: Poem as Travelogue, deadline: April 1, 2008
Fall 2008: CV2's Annual Open Issue, deadline: July 10, 2008

A note on submissions from CV2: "We suggest that writers research literary journals carefully before submitting their work to determine that the journal’s aesthetics match that of their writing."

Submissions :: Split this Rock 1.30.08

Split This Rock
Call for poetry films and videos

Poems of Provocation & Witness
Poets have long played a central role in movements for social change. Today, at a critical juncture in our country’s history, poetry that gives voice to the voiceless, names the unnamable, and speaks directly from the individual and collective conscience is more important than ever. The festival will explore and celebrate the many ways that poetry can act as an agent for change: reaching across differences, considering personal and social responsibility, asserting the centrality of the right to free speech, bearing witness to the diversity and complexity of human experience through language, imagining a better world.

Film & Video Submissions:
We are looking for artistic, experimental, and challenging film/video interpretations of poetry that explore critical social issues. Selected work will be screened during the Split This Rock Poetry Festival film program.

Deadline: postmarked by January 30th, 2008
Entry fee: $15.00 (non-refundable)
Notification by February 15th, 2008
Festival dates: March 20th-23rd, 2008

Monday, December 10, 2007

Submissions :: STORYGLOSSIA

STORYGLOSSIA is open again for new submissions. The guidelines have changed, so be sure to read them over before submitting. They are currently reading submissions for Issue 27 (March 2008) which is being guest edited by Katrina Denza.

Katrina's story "Here's My Hand, Take It" appeared in STORYGLOSSIA Issue 13 and her story "Snake Dreams"was awarded first runner-up in the 2006 STORYGLOSSIA Fiction Prize contest and appeared in Issue 16. Her story "Honeymoon" is upcoming in Issue 25, which is a special flash fiction issue scheduled to publish December 15th.

She is a four-time Pushcart nominee for her short fiction and her stories can be found in recent issues of New Delta Review, The MacGuffin, SmokeLong Quarterly, Cranky, The Jabberwock Review, REAL, Emrys Journal, elimae, The Emerson Review, and are forthcoming from Confrontation and Passages North.

Katrina was previously a member of the SmokeLong Quarterly editorial team, including guest editing their Issue Thirteen, and STORYGLOSSIA is excited to have her editing their Issue 27!

Read the guidelines and send her your best work.

New Lit on the Block :: Newport Review

Newport Review is an independent journal of fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction and visual art. The magazine was founded by award-winning poet and writer Michele Cooper. Newport Review began publication in Newport, Rhode Island in the 1980s, and published as a print journal through the 1990s, most often annually. Guest editors included Stuart Blazer and Susan Grant. In their web manifestation, they hope to continue publishing innovative, language-rich flash fiction, prose poetry and poetry, as well as longer works: short stories, novel excerpts, one-act plays and creative nonfiction. Without the limitations or expenses of print reproduction, they will also welcome more visual artwork: both black & white and color photography, graphic stories (or “comix,” if you prefer) and original artwork. Check out their premier issue online now: Newport Review, Autumn Harvest 2007.

Lit Mag Mailbag :: December 10

For information about these and many other quality literary magazines, click the links or visit The NewPages Guide to Literary Journals. Also visit the NewPages Literary Magazine Reviews for new reviews as well as an archive of past reviews.

32 Poems
Volume 5 Number 2
Fall 2007
Biannual

Absinthe
Number 8
2007
Biannual

Agni
Number 66
2007
Biannual

Atlanta Review
Volume 13 Number 2
Spring/Summer 2007
Biannual

Bellingham Review
30th Anniversary Edition
Volume 30 Numbers 1 & 2 Issue 59
Spring/Fall 2007
Biannual

Chicago Review
Volume 53 Number 2/3
Autumn 2007
Triannual

Colorado Review
"The Winner of the 2007 Neddligan Prize for Short Fiction"
Volume 34 Number 3
Fall/Winter 2007
Triannual

Conjunctions
49
2007
Biannual

Contemporary Verse 2
The Open Issue
Volume 30 Issue 2
Autumn 2007
Quarterly

Crab Creek Review
Volume 21 Number 1
Fall/Winter 2007
Biannual

Diner
A Journal of Poetry: Final Issue
Volume 7
2007
Biannual

Fiddlehead
Number 233
Fall 2007
Quarterly

Field
Number 77
Fall 2007
Biannual

Glimmer Train
Issue 65
Winter 2008
Quarterly

Ibbetson Street Press
Issue 22
November 2007

Knockout
Volume 1 Issue 1
Spring 2008
Biannual

The New Centennial Review
Volume 7 Number 2
Fall 2007
Triannual

/nor
(New Ohio Review)
Issue 2
Fall 2007
Biannual

Poet Lore
Volume 102 Numbers 3/4
Fall/Winter 2007
Biannual

The Rambler
Volume 4 Number 6
Nov-Dec 2007
Bi-monthly

Tarpaulin Sky
Issue 13 Print Issue 1
Fall/Winter 2007
Online mag that prints issue

Thereby Hangs a Thread
Issue 2
Summer 2007
Biannual

Tuesday: An Art Project
Poems Photographs Prints (Postcard Packet)
Volume 1 Number 2
Fall 2007

Sunday, December 09, 2007

Paul Muldoon at Cafe Improv

The New New Yorker Poetry Editor

Muldoon Mulls Over Nature, Candy Bars
By Becky Lang
The Minnesota Daily
November 30, 2007


"Finally there's a poet to express the less-than-timeless tribulations of the soccer mom. Princeton professor, New Yorker poetry editor and garage-band lyricist Paul Muldoon has learned the subtle art of inflating virtually anything with poetry. 'The time of day when light fails on the field / and gives back a sky more muddy than mother-of-pearl,' is just one line from the short ode to the Gatorade-toting masters of the minivan. Apparently, rhyming 'soccer ball' with 'shopping mall' is for amateurs.

"With more than two dozen poetry compilations, two children's books, and a few translations on his résumé, the Irish-born Muldoon has received the Pulitzer Prize for poetry, and nabbed himself a mantle-full of awards. Muldoon took a break from his Thanksgiving festivities to chat with A&E about the particulars of making one's way in the world of words..."

Read the interview here.

Includes such questions as:

What kinds of poems submitted to the New Yorker do you instantly throw out? In other words, what are your pet peeves when it comes to poetry?

What is different about Irish poetry from American poetry?

Who is the most historically overrated poet? The most underrated?

Submissions :: Relief

Relief: A Quarterly Christian Expression is entering its second year of publication. This new literary journal is designed for authors who want to write seriously, but struggle to find an outlet for poetry and prose that have a faithful slant. Their goal is to publish poems, creative nonfiction, and short stories that push the envelope beyond stereotypically "fluffy" Christian writing, encouraging writers to feel free to stand out on the edge.

Relief is currently seeking short fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry for issue 2.2 (Spring 2008). Cash prizes will be awarded to "Editor's Choice" for each genre. Submissions will only be accepted through our online submission process.

Harvest Tour :: Higher Grounds Coffee

Fair Trade and Indigenous Autonomy in the Mayan Highlands
February 11th - February 18th, 2008


Join Higher Grounds on an adventure through the Mayan Highlands of Chiapas, Mexico visiting two organic and fair trade coffee co-ops working to create community sustainability and various autonomous projects. Trip highlights:

Spend the day at a certified organic, Fair Trade Coffee Cooperative to learn about the positive impacts of Fair Trade

Visit local coffee growing communities to learn about indigenous culture and the use of organic agriculture as a means to self-sufficiency

Learn about the “Other Campaign” – A new political initiative by the EZLN to build a national plan of struggle

Examine the issue of land rights and see first hand the global threats to the Mayan communities very existence

Learn about innovative, sustainable water projects taking place to support communal access to fresh water

Meet with a successful women’s artisan cooperative in the highlands and learn about the production of fair trade artisan goods

Witness first-hand the effects the global economy has on indigenous peoples

If you can't make the trip, at least consider supporting their work through the purchase of their GREAT coffee. A NewPages staple.

Thursday, December 06, 2007

Introducing :: Radical Studies Journal

New from Michigan State University, the Journal for the Study of Radicalism engages in serious, scholarly exploration of the forms, representations, meanings, and historical influences of radical social movements.

The first two volumes focus on radicalism and violence and radicalism and music. The include interviews with Lawrence Robert "Pun" Plamondon and John Sinclair.

Future issues will include themes like the re-conceptualization of “left” and “right,” radical groups typically ignored in academic scholarship, such as deep ecologists, primitivists, and anarchists, the role of science and technology in radical visions, transnational and regional understandings of radicalism, and the relationships of radical movements to land and environment.

Submissions :: Thereby Hangs a Tale 2.15.08

Thereby Hangs a Tale is currently accepting submissions for its fourth print issue due out is Fall 2008. Each issue of THaT explores the stories that for around a single word. For Issue Four, that word is TASTE. Accepting fiction, poetry, non-fiction, and essays under 2,000 words. The deadline for submissions in February 15, 2008.

Tuesday, December 04, 2007

New Lit on the Block :: Knockout

"Knockout is here, and the first issue features some of the finest writers working today. Half of the proceeds from sales of issue one will go to the Valentino Achak Deng Foundation, an organizaiton established to help those affected by the civil war in Sudan, and a portion of the proceeds from teh sale of future issues will go to other charitable causes.

"The first issue, all poetry, includes work by a number of well-known writers, including Marvin Bell, Thomas Lux, Todd Boss, Aaron Smith, Carl Phillips, Carol Guess, Larissa Szporluk, Laurie Blauner, Lynn Levin, Timothy Liu, Jonathan Williams, Thomas Meyer, Jim Elledge, Christopher Hennessy, Ronald H. Bayes, CAConrad, Gerard Wozek, Jeff Mann, Michael Montlack, Jeffery Beam, Robert Bly, Ger Killeen, Denver Butson, Dan Pinkerton, Charles Jensen, Brent Goodman, Theodore Enslin, Alberto Rios, David Mason, Billy Collins, Mabel Yu, Kim Lambright and Joseph Massey, among others.

"Knockout is considering poems for #2 & #3. Translations are welcome, as long as you have permission of the author (as long as they are still kicking), and we're particularly interested in translations in German, Chinese, the Nordic Languages, and translations from the Middle East."

Judges Wanted :: storySouth

From Jason Sanford, editor of storySouth: a journal of literature from the New South

"...our annual Million Writers Award is gearing up for its 2008 run. We are now accepting applications for preliminary judges and are looking for people knowledgeable in each of the different literary genres. These judges will help screen the nominations and select the list of notable stories of the year. To apply, e-mail me your writing and/or editing experience and why you think you'd make a good preliminary judge."

Submissions :: Ignavia Press

Ignavia is an online journal that promotes fiction that is transgressive in content and form with a bias for material that is dark, edgy and queer. Ignavia seeks transgressive fiction (under 4000 words) for their second issue scheduled for early 2008.

Monday, December 03, 2007

On Vacation :: Diner Literary Journal

"Diner is going on a hiatus - the "On Vacation" sign is taped to the window. We are feeling the financial burden of printing, mailing and lack of staff. The cost of mailing alone went up over 30% last May. Diner as an independent journal has been a labor of love done by volunteers. The Tips jar doesn't begin to cover the printer, the postage, the envelopes, and all the other sundry expenses. We have survived for 7 years – 2 issues printing astounding work – by the skin of our teeth. We thank each and every one of you who have submitted your work – and all those who have subscribed at whatever level – you all count. I wish I could hold a party and make my special blackberry pancakes, with a side of home fries, for all of you.

"Nevertheless we are going out with an explosion of outstanding poetry, fiction, essays and art. Of particular notice is award-winning author Adria Bernard 's elegy to her teacher and friend Senator Paul Wellstone of Minnesota who died October 22, 2002, in a plane crash. Also of note are our two Blue Plate Specials: James Dempsey with new translations of Chaucer's court poetry and Martha Carlson-Bradley, with an excerpt from her latest manuscript The Sea Called Fruitfulness, poems inspired by the two Jesuits who first mapped the moon.

"Our last issue proclaimed, 'Our intention is not only to preserve the light (of discourse in the midst of increasing darkness) that shines today, but to increase the brightness of that light with every issue.' It is with great sadness that the lights of Diner are flickering off.

"There is a chance that Diner will open again as an online journal or a print journal if we can find a school or sponsor willing to finance what has turned out to be one the best journals in the country. We are proud of every issue we published and whatever happens, we have no regrets. All the effort has been worth it."

Eve Rifkah & Michael Milligan

Dinty Moore on First-Year Writers

Here's a good one for those of us coming to the end of the semester.

On Seeing Clearly
By Dinty W. Moore

From Inside Higher Ed
November 30, 2007

"After sixteen years of pushing that old pedagogical stone up the hill, I sometimes question whether the conventional undergraduate—a nineteen- or twenty-year old American child of the middle class—really wants to see the world clearly. Or if he even has the ability.

"Now there are exceptions, surely, but I am talking about the general mass of students, those that want to write, want to be writers, certainly want to have written, but can’t be prodded or cajoled or threatened into saying something other than what they know to be safe, acceptable, and familiar. These are good students, by and large. Many of them have admirable skill at assembling sentences, images, scenes, and metaphors. But the writing reveals nothing, goes nowhere, and deliberately takes no chances...." [read the rest here]

Nelligan Prize for Fiction Winner :: Thomas Grattan

Colorado Review, Volume 34 Number 3, Fall/Winter 2007 is out and features the winner of the 2007 Nelligan Prize for Short Fiction: Thomas Grattan's story "I Am a Souvenir.” Final Judge Charles Baster said of the work: "This story is both elliptical and straightforward, beautifully detailed and psychologically intricate. The events are crisply narrated, surprising, and slightly shocking, though completely plausible." Grattan is a graduate of the Brooklyn College M.F.A. program. His work has been chosen as a finalist for the Iowa Review Fiction Award, and he is also the recipient of the Lainoff Prize for fiction.

Deadline for the Fifth Annual Nelligan Prize for Short Fiction is postmark January 15, 2008 - March 15, 2008.

Saturday, December 01, 2007

Lit Mag Mailbag :: December 1

For information about these and many other quality literary magazines, click the links or visit The NewPages Guide to Literary Journals. Also visit the NewPages Literary Magazine Reviews for new reviews as well as an archive of past reviews.

The American Poetry Review
Volume 36 Number 6
Nov/Dec 2007
Bimonthly

Antioch Review
"Falkland (Malvinas) Islands: Sounth Atlantic's Forgotten War”
Volume 65 Number 4
Fall 2007
Quarterly

Callaloo
The Cultures and Letters of the Black Diaspora: 30th Anniversary Issue 3/4
Volume 30 Number 2
Spring 2007
Quarterly

Cimarron Review
Issue 161
Fall 2007
Quarterly

Fifth Wednesday Journal
Issue 1
Fall 2007
Biannual

Gargoyle
Audio CD only
Number 52
2007
Annual

The Gettysburg Review
Volume 20 Number 4
Winter 2007
Quarterly

Hollins Critic
William Steinkraus
Volume 44 Number 4
October 2007
Five Times

Hunger Mountain
Issue 11
Fall 2007
Biannual

The Journal of Ordinary Thought
Lessons Outside: JOT Writers on Formal and Informal Education
Summer 2007
Quarterly

Lady Churchill's Rosebud Wristlet
Number 21
November 2007
Biannual

The Land-Grant College Review
Issue Number 4
2007

The Missouri Review
"Exposed"
Volume 30 Number 3
Fall 2007
Quarterly

NANO Fiction
"A Journal of Short Fiction" from UoHouston Undergrad
Volume 1 Number 2
2007
Biannual

One Story
“Bar Joke, Arizona” bySam Allingham
Issue 97
2007
Monthly

Opium
Number 5
Winter 2007
Biannual

Pembroke Magazine
African American Literature (U of N.C.)
Number 39
2007
Annual

Poetry
Volume 191 Number 2
November 2007
Monthly

[sic]
2
2007
Annual(?)

Watershed
CSU, Chico's Literary Magazine
Volume 30 Number 2
Spring 2007
Biannual

Alt Mag Mailbag :: December 1

For information about these and many other quality alternative magazines, click the links or visit The NewPages Guide to Alternative Magazines.

Against the Current
Volume 22 Number 4
November/December 2007
Bimonthly

Feminist Studies
Volume 33 Number 3
Summer 2007
Triannual

Free Inquiry
Volume 28 Number 1
December 2007/January 2008
Bimonthly

Funny Times
December 2007
Monthly

Humor Times
Issue Number 192
December 2007
Monthly

In These Times
"iPower to the People"
Volume 31 Number 12
December 2007
Monthly

Labor Notes
Number 345
December 2007
Monthly

Space and Culture
International Journal of Social Spaces
Volume 10 Number 4
November 2007
Quarterly

Turning the Tide
Journal of Anti-Racist Action, Research & Education
Volume 20 Number 5-6
Oct-Dec 2007

Z Magazine
November 2007
Monthly