Saturday, March 24, 2007

Million Poems Show NYC

"The next episode of The Million Poems Show is this Monday, March 26, at 6:30 p.m. at the Bowery Poetry Club (1st & Bowery, NYC). Buck Downs, author of Marijuana Soft Drink, Recreational Vehicle, and many other fundamentally unstoppably brilliant collections of poems, will be taking the stage. As will Nicole Renaud, the singer the New York Times describes as an "ethereal soprano," and whom the New Yorker says "earns the overused descriptor ethereal." Franklin Bruno sings the theme song, banters, collaborates, and if you're good, he takes us out with a song. And as for me [Jordan Davis], I try to make it so you almost forget you're at a poetry event. The Million Poems Show is free. What's more, it coincides with happy hour -- come by Monday, have a couple drinks. The words will do things you don't see coming."

Comic Books





Two new offerings from Nick Threndyle, artist and poet out of Victoria, BC - Gringo and Burn All Stations. Sample pages can be viewed on his website. Not new to zines/graphic fiction, Threndyle's work, Golden Eyes on the Ocean Floor had previously been reviewed in the NewPages Zine Rack.


Also in the mail, Street Pizza #1 from Undercore Comix hand-drawn and inked by underground cartoonist Andy P., creator of Tromatic Tendencies: The Story of Lloyd Kaufman.

Friday, March 23, 2007

Literary blog shop

Press Press Press "is a blog-shop for small poetry presses & journals. If you like small poetry presses & journals then you should stop in & see what's new. Everything is new. All of the time."

Tuesday, March 20, 2007

Words

Why Sexist Language Matters, by Sherryl Kleinman, AlterNet. "Gendered words and phrases like 'you guys' may seem small compared to issues like violence against women, but changing our language is an easy way to begin overcoming gender inequality."

Monday, March 19, 2007

Literary magazine reviews

We've posted a new batch of lit mag reviews at NewPages.com. Reviews of Barrelhouse, Burnside Review, The Chattahoochee Review, Crazyhorse, Fairy Tale Review, Five Points, Georgia State University Review, Green Mountains Review, Hunger Mountain, The Literary Review, Natural Bridge, Pleiades, Prairie Schooner, The Sewanee Review, The Souther Review, and subTerrian. Some really good reading!

Saturday, March 17, 2007

Books

LibriVox free audio books from LibrarianActivist.org: "LibriVox is a volunteer project with the goal of making pubilc domain works available as audio books. There’s a plethora of goodies here for bibliophiles. Not only is the available of classic works a beautiful thing, but access to audio books is a boon to those who benefit from having access to books through alternative mediums … coming to mind: people who self-identify as LD, ADHD, or visually impaired..."

Books

Congratulations, Christopher Hitchens! But Why Won't You Bring The Funny? From the Huffington Post. "...his upcoming book, God Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything (May 1, 2007), sounds like a laugh riot. Check out this sample line: 'Monotheistic religion is a plagiarism of a plagiarism of a hearsay of a hearsay, of an illusion of an illusion, extending all the way back to a fabrication of a few nonevents.' Try the veal! Remember to tip your waitress!

Book Reviews

Scarcity of Ads EndangersNewspapers' Book Sections. Wall Street Journal. "Most newly published books don't get any consumer advertising at all. Instead, publishers employ publicists to spread the word to readers through interviews, reviews and book signings. Increasingly, publishers are also using independent bloggers to convey news of new titles, which helps to pinpoint specific interest groups."

Libraries

New Progressive Librarians Guild chapter at Graduate School of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. "The purpose of PLG is to foster discussion and action related to librarianship and social responsibility. We believe that the vital role of the library in a democratic society requires a politically and socially engaged profession." Includes links to other chapters.

Book Review

Poets in full bloom. Leslie Adrienne Miller, Deborah Keenan and Diane Glancy -- longtime Minnesota English professors -- are at the height of their poetic powers in these three new collections. Reviews by Andrea Hoag, Minneapolis Star-Tribune.

Wednesday, March 14, 2007

Scene New: Lit Mags

One of the benefits of attending AWP is getting to meet and discover “new” lit mags on the scene. As saddened as we so often are to hear of magazines folding under economic or other life constraints, it is at the same time with great joy that we see new mags crop up, with invigorated, often "youthful" labor, and somehow enough change in their pockets (or foraging skills) to get the publication started. Who knows where these fresh starts may end up; no doubt some of the long-standing lit mags have staff who remember their start-up days — before they went glossy, before they went 501c(3), before the .com, before finding a comfortable hold within academic walls, or perhaps after leaving academia behind... A smattering of new mags offering an infusion of hope include:










Alehouse, San Francisco, CA. Editor Jay Rubin, Contributing Editors Edward A. Dougherty, Kake Huck, and Gary Lessing.

Cannibal, Brooklyn, NY. Editors Matthew Henriksen (also of TYPO) and Katy Henriksen.

Cave Wall, Greensboro, NC. Editor Rhett Iseman.

New Ohio Review or /nor, Ohio University, Athens, OH. Managing Editor John Bullock.

Short Story, Columbia, SC. Editor Caroline Lord.


We wish these newbies the best in their endeavors, and hope to see them continue to grace our pages.

Poetry

The Spring 2007 Book Sense Picks Poetry Top Ten. "The list features a notable selection, including titles from a former U.S. poet laureate, a Nobel Prize winner, a Yale Series of Younger Poets winner, and comprehensive collections of two contemporary masters. The Poetry Top Ten is the result of strong support from booksellers, reflecting a deep level of knowledge and commitment."

Bookstores


Changing Hands Named PW's Bookseller of the Year. Changing Hands Bookstore in Tempe, Arizona, has been named the recipient of the 15th annual Bookseller of the Year Award from Publishers Weekly. The bookstore, which celebrates its 33rd anniversary this year, is co-owned by Gayle Shanks, her husband, Bob Sommer, and Susie Brazil. PW reported that the store was nominated by Random House's district sales manager, Ron Smith, who said, "The enthusiasm, energy and creativity of the people of Changing Hands Bookstore is what makes me look forward to each visit."

Online lit mag

Open Letters: A Monthly Arts & Literature Review debuts with "among other things, a sharp, critical work by John Cotter on the reviews of Martin Amis's "House of Meetings"; an involved examination of the writing of young first-time novelists; and our headliner, an unsparing assessment of ALL 20th literature by Steve Donoghue."

Sunday, March 11, 2007

Roger, roger!


Another lit mag face lift – er, name lift: roger, an art & literary magazine is the former Calliope (of Ampersand Press), still based out of Roger Williams University. While the current editorial staff remarks that “we will avail ourselves of the Internet with our Web site,” the site has yet to be “launched” (what's there now isn't much...). Still, the publication is “committed to hard copy,” so it would seem it’s just a matter of getting name, web space and print publication to fuse as one for this publication to become fluent in its efforts. For NewPages users, the sooner on the web presence, the better!

Friday, March 09, 2007

Two Lines Journal Crosses the Line


Two Lines: World Writing in Translation, part of the Center for the Art of Translation in San Francisco, CA, has published English translations of fiction and poetry from more than 50 languages for over a decade. Now, thanks to partnership with the University of Washington Press, this former journal has shed its ISSN to become a full-fledged ISBN'd book. "Better for distribution and sales," says Promita Chatterji, Two Lines Marketing Administrator, and better as well as for the continued excessive content that burst the seams of the lit journal boundaries. ("Really, it's a journal," they would say, hefting it two-handed off the table at AWP to suspicious readers.) Our best to Two Lines on their new venture; we'll miss them on the NewPages lit mag list.

Thursday, March 08, 2007

Coleman Barks at AWP

Hearing Coleman Barks read at AWP Atlanta was the absolute highlight for me. I’ve read much of his translation of Rumi and only knew that of him. I was equally awed by his reading his own poetry that night – his non-Rumi poems. Not only is his delivery enough to carry you from the physical realm into the poetic ethereal, but his down-homey nature in his reading was like being wrapped in a cozy blanket on a cold winter’s eve. While reading, he would interject chuckles, amused by the memory of the line or the event therein reflected, and would add commentary, such as “This really happened,” as he talked the crowd of hundreds through his lines as though to a single friend over coffee. A smattering of his poetry with RealAudio recordings can be found on Courtland Review’s website. Coleman will be busy traveling this year, celebrating the 800th birthday of Rumi; if you’re lucky enough, you might be able to catch up with him.

Wednesday, March 07, 2007

Meena at AWP

Like most of those who attended AWP in Atlanta (Feb. 28 - Mar. 4), I'm still in hangover mode - and it has nothing (or at least little) to do with alcohol. My mind is still spinning with memories of meeting dozens of people, from teachers to publishers, students in MFA programs to published authors, and so many, many people who just wanted to stop by and say "Thanks" to NewPages for the work we do (likewise - I'm sure!). Yet, now sorting through my two boxes of lit mags to get listed, the first one I pulled out was one that most impressed me among new publications: Meena.

What makes the mag a standout is very concept of it: English/Egyptian works both in their original language and in translation (half the pub is English, the other half Arabic), with art throughout. From the pub site: "The word 'meena' means port, or port-of-entry, in Arabic, and that is exactly what we would like Meena to be: a port between our cities, our countries, our languages, our cultures. 'We' are a group of writers and artists based in the port cities of New Orleans and Alexandria but from all over the United States and Egypt (and beyond) who want to share our work with each other and with you."

Given the global climate, this is a publication well worth checking out and including in course reading lists, library collections and just passing around the cafe.

Online lit mags

Wheelhouse Magazine Online launches its debut issue, Vol. 1, with contributions from fiction writers Jim Ruland, Nahid Rachlin, Mimi Albert, Diane Lefer, Curtis Harnack, Lourdes Vasquez; poetry from Tung Hui Hu, Pat Falk, Natasha Saje, Marilyn Taylor, and Jared Carter; visual arts by Daniel Johnston, Tom Carey, and Marc Leuthold; essayists Steve Heller and Sheyene Foster Heller.

Online lit mags

BENT PIN Quarterly, a new online journal is currently accepting poetry, essays, and flash fiction for its first issue, Spring 2007.

Literary magazines

Connecticut Review, Georgetown Review, and Upstreet are new additions to our NewPages guide to literary magazines.

Online lit mags

Clemson Poetry Review is a new online literary journal based at Clemson University in South Carolina that publishes undergraduate and graduate poetry exclusively twice a year, spring and fall.

Contests

Check contests with March dealines in the NewPages.com Writing Contests page.